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Academic Integrity

Policy Group(s): Group B: Academic – 1: Students (Ref: B1/1111.1- 1216)
Related Groups: Group B: Academic – 2: Staff
Related Policy:
Assessment
Code of Conduct
Examinations Grievance Policy and Procedures for Domestic Students – Academic
Grievances
Grievance Policy for Overseas Students
Commencement Date: January 2012
Review Date: November 2021
Policy
Additional Information

Intent:

In accordance with its foundation on Christian principles as informed by Scripture, Christian Heritage College (CHC) is committed to maintaining the highest levels of personal, professional and ethical conduct. Students, have a responsibility to maintain the highest standards of academic integrity in their work. Honesty, trust, equity, respect and personal responsibility are at the heart of all academic discourse and are values central to Christianity.

This policy outlines CHC’s standards in relation to academic integrity.

Scope: 

All staff and students of CHC.

Restrictions: Nil

Exclusions: Nil

Objectives:

1.     To provide clear guidelines for academic integrity.

2.     To provide clear definitions of professional academic practice (Provision 3), inappropriate academic practice (Provision 4), poor academic conduct (Provision 5), and academic misconduct (Provision 6).

3.     To provide clear guidelines for identifying poor academic conduct and academic misconduct.

4.     To implement transparent and equitable procedures for dealing with student poor academic conduct.

5.     To provide education for students towards professional academic practice.

6.     To provide for penalties for poor academic conduct.

Policy provisions:

1.     General

1.1.   Honesty, trust, equity, respect and personal responsibility are at the heart of all academic discourse.

1.2.   CHC aims to create a positive environment for academic achievement and expects all members of its community to maintain high standards of Christian conduct and to behave honestly and ethically.

1.3.   CHC is committed to helping members of its community to act responsibly and ethically.

1.4.   Inappropriate academic practice includes plagiarism, collusion, misrepresentation, cheating and the aiding of others in any of these practices.

1.5.   In the case of students, inappropriate academic practice may breach the Code of Conduct policy. it may result in failure or repeating of the assessment task, failure of the entire unit or study or course or exclusion from CHC.

2.     Academic Integrity

2.1.   As an academic institution, CHC values critical thinking and a comprehensive and well-founded academic knowledge base which includes the theoretical foundations of the relevant discipline(s).

2.2.   CHC has adopted the following definition of academic integrity: ‘a commitment, even in the face of adversity, to five fundamental values: honesty, trust, equity, respect and responsibility.’[1]

2.2.1.CHC expects honesty in academic work, both personally and professionally, for teaching and learning, research and service.[2]

2.2.2.CHC promotes trust by presenting clear guidelines and procedures for all academic work.[3]

2.2.3.CHC exercises fairness by declaring and applying clear and accurate expectations and standards in relation to all academic work[4].

2.2.4.CHC respects and values the academic freedom of staff and students to hold and justify a diverse range of opinions and ideas.[5]

2.2.5.All members of the CHC community are responsible for sustaining the integrity of the scholarship of teaching and learning, research and service and are duty-bound to take action when academic integrity is compromised. [6]

2.3.   Appropriate academic practices uphold these values in all areas of academic work.

2.4.   Failure to uphold these values is considered to be inappropriate academic practice.

2.5.   CHC will investigate all cases of inappropriate academic practice.

3.     Professional Academic Practice

At CHC professional academic practice is evidenced by:

3.1.   Actively engaging in scholarly and research activities through personal reading and research and appropriate discussions with others, either face-to-face and/or online.

3.2.   Engaging with the relevant academic literature at the depth and breadth expected of the level of the unit being undertaken[7].

3.3.   Maintaining appropriate records of all sources used in the development of academic work.

3.4.   Preparing academic work that is substantially written in one’s own words.

3.5.   Providing citations and developing reference lists that acknowledge the contribution of the work of others in the development of academic work.

3.6.   Attending to the requirements regarding the presentation of the relevant assessment genre.

3.7.   Securing all paper and electronic copies of academic work to minimise the opportunity for inappropriate academic practice by others.

4.     Inappropriate Academic Practice

Inappropriate academic practice may be the result of either poor academic conduct or academic misconduct.  It includes the following:

4.1. Plagiarism – taking the ideas of another and using them as one’s own in academic work. There are various types of plagiarism.  These include:

4.1.1. Verbatim copying – copying phrases, entire sentences or paragraphs verbatim without citing the source;

4.1.2. Sham plagiarising – copying a paragraph from another source, changing a few words so it is not a verbatim quote, and then acknowledging the source;

4.1.3. Illicit plagiarising – paraphrasing from another source but not citing the source;

4.1.4. Self-plagiarising, recycling or double-dipping – submitting an item or part of an item that was previously submitted for another task in the same or a different unit without appropriate citation.

4.1.5. Recycling – submitting an item or part of an item that was previously submitted by another student in the same or a different unit.

4.1.6. Incidental plagiarising – inadequate, incorrect or inconsistent citation and/or referencing of sources, close paraphrasing and/or copying where there is no evidence of intent and where plagiarism is minor (less than 5% of text).

4.1.7. Contract cheating – purchasing an assessment task and submitting it as their own work.

4.2. Collusion – Inappropriate collaboration by students with others in the development of academic work. While collaborative learning between students is encouraged, it can inadvertently result in collusion and allegations of academic misconduct unless the distinction between collaboration and collusion is fully appreciated.

4.2.1. With the exception of assessment tasks which require a joint submission, all assessment tasks must be submitted individually, and the marker is entitled to consider identical layout, identical mistakes, identical arguments and identical presentation to be prima facie evidence of collusion.

4.2.2. Collusion may be present in both individual and group tasks.

4.2.3 Collusion on individual assessment tasks happens when two or more students collaborate and submit individual copies of the same work, or a part thereof, as original.

4.2.4 Collusion in group work can occur when, for example:

4.2.5 Students discuss how to approach a common assessment item that requires individual submissions and the same or very similar approaches are reflected in the submitted assessments without any acknowledgement of collaboration with colleagues;

4.2.6 A group is required to collaborate on an assessment item where there are also some individual components but the team and individual efforts are not clearly distinguished.

4.2.7 To minimise the potential for collusion, staff should set appropriate conditions for group work as per the Assessment policy, make clear the extent of any collaboration allowed and inform students how individual contributions will be assessed.

4.3. Misrepresentation – making false claims in relation to academic work. Misrepresentation includes the following:

4.3.1. Ghostwriting– submitting an item that was written or substantially edited by someone else, whether purchased or not;

4.3.2. Copy editing – submitting an item that was copy-edited either substantially or whole except when acknowledged or approved by a course coordinator and acknowledged by a student.

4.3.3. Over-using direct quotations from others, with appropriate referencing, such that the work is not substantially written in the writer’s own words;

4.3.4. Providing references but failing to clearly indicate the nature or extent of the use of the sources;

4.3.5. Failing to acknowledge the contribution of others in academic work;

4.3.6. Falsifying data, procedures or analyses used in academic work.

4.4. Cheating is defined as dishonest dealings to gain an advantage.  Cheating includes, but is not limited to:

4.4.1. The use of any unauthorised assistance, materials or equipment in taking oral or written tests or examinations;

4.4.2. The acquisition and/or distribution, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to CHC, a member of its staff or a member of the student body in advance of the official distribution by CHC to all examination candidates;

4.4.3. Providing or receiving information which is prejudicial to the fair conduct of the examination during the conduct of the examination;

4.4.4. Tampering or attempting to tamper with any item used in the assessment of students;

4.4.5. Failing to abide by directions from the unit coordinator or lecturer regarding the permitted level of collaboration between students on items submitted for assessment;

4.4.6. Impersonating or attempting to impersonate another person in assessment activities;

4.4.7. Transmission of information on the contents of an examination paper to another candidate who is still to sit that paper.

4.5. Aiding others – providing assistance to another person in any of the above.

5.     Poor Academic Conduct

5.1.   CHC defines poor academic conduct as inappropriate academic practices associated with:

5.1.1. Carelessness;

5.1.2. Lack of education about quality academic practices;

5.1.3. Lack of thoroughness, accuracy or attention to detail in relation to professional academic practice.

5.2. Poor academic conduct can result in plagiarism, collusion, misrepresentation or aiding another person, even if unintentional (see Provision 3 above).

5.3. CHC supports students by providing education about appropriate academic practices in the context of their discipline and clear examples of what is acceptable.

5.4. CHC considers that the likelihood that breaches of academic integrity (see Provision 2 above) and professional academic practice (see Provision 3 above) constitutes poor academic conduct diminishes rapidly after the first 12 months of enrolment.

6. Academic Misconduct

6.1. CHC defines academic misconduct as:

6.1.1. Intentional breaches of academic integrity (see Provision 2 above);

6.1.2. Intentional breaches of good academic practice (see Provision 3 above).

6.2. Academic misconduct can result in plagiarism, collusion, misrepresentation or aiding another person (see Provision 4 above).

6.3. CHC supports staff and students by providing education about academic misconduct in the context of their discipline and clear examples of what is acceptable.

6.4. CHC considers that the likelihood that breaches of academic integrity (see Provision 2 above) and professional academic practice (see Provision 3 above) constitutes academic misconduct increases substantially after the first 12 months of enrolment.

6.5. CHC considers that the likelihood that breaches of academic integrity (see Provision 2 above) and professional academic practice (see Provision 3 above).

7.     Responding to Inappropriate Academic Practice

7.1. CHC responds to all identified or reported cases of alleged inappropriate academic practice (see Supporting Procedures and Guidelines 1).

7.2. Where inappropriate academic practice is identified in the work of a student, staff should, in consultation with the Dean, or their nominated representative, determine whether the inappropriate practice should be dealt with as poor academic conduct or as academic misconduct.

8.     Dealing with Poor Academic Conduct

8.1.   Where instances of inappropriate academic practice are identified within the first 12 months of a student’s enrolment in a course of study, CHC is committed to educating students in appropriate academic practices.

8.1.1. taff should respond to cases of inappropriate academic practice as poor academic conduct unless there is evidence of intent.

8.1.2. Where there is evidence of intent, staff should refer cases to the Dean, or their nominated representative, who should address the matter as alleged academic misconduct (Supporting Procedures and Guidelines 2).

8.1.3. Staff who identify poor academic conduct are responsible for addressing the matter with the students concerned. This will include providing education to help students understand the processes of academic integrity and quality academic practice.

8.1.4. Wherever possible, students should be given an opportunity to correct the identified issues in the piece of work through resubmission or a supplementary task.

8.1.5. Students will not pass the relevant criterion(a) or can do no better than a pass with a resubmit. Penalties should apply to misconduct only.

8.2. Staff should refer all cases of alleged inappropriate academic practice that occur after the first 12 months of a student’s enrolment in a course of study at CHC, to the Dean, or their nominated representative and it should be dealt with as alleged academic misconduct (Supporting Procedures and Guidelines 2).

9.     Dealing with Student Academic Misconduct

9.1.   When dealing with student academic misconduct refer to the Code of Conduct policy.

10.  Appeals

10.1. Should a student become aggrieved by a decision regarding academic misconduct, the student has the right of appeal. CHC’s appeals processes for students are outlined in the Grievance Policy and Procedures for Domestic Students – Academic Grievances and the Grievance Procedures for Overseas Students. These arrangements do not negate the right of overseas students to pursue any other legal remedies under the Australian Consumer Protection laws.

[1] The Center for Academic Integrity [CAI] 1999, The Fundamental Values of Academic Integrity, p. 4

[7] One or more phrases, sentences or paragraphs from a source and then citing the sources.

POLICY FURTHER INFORMATION

Relevant Commonwealth/State Legislation Higher Education Standards Framework (2015)

ACCOUNTABILITIES

Implementation: Deans
Compliance: Academic Board
Monitoring and Evaluation: Academic Board
Development/Review: Academic Board; Policy Standing Committee
Approval Authority: Academic Board
Interpretation and Advice: Academic Registrar’s Office

WHO SHOULD KNOW THIS POLICY?

Students

Deans

Academic Staff

Academic Administration Staff

EFFECTIVENESS OF THIS POLICY

Performance indicators: ·   The number of formal hearings

·   The number of appeals

Other Nil
Definitions and Acronyms: CHC –  Christian Heritage College

APPROVAL section maintained by the Director of Quality and Standards

Reference No. Approved Date Committee/Board Resolution No. / Minute Ref.
B1/1111.1 Yes 24/11/2011 Academic Board 4.1

REVISION HISTORY section maintained by the Director of Quality and Standards

Revision Reference No. Approved/Rescinded Date Committee/Board Resolution No. / Minute Ref.
1216 Approved 08/12/2016 Academic Board 4.1